Women

‘Hannibal’ Changed the Game for Women and Gender on Television

January 18, 2018 // 1 Comment

NBC’s Hannibal likes to play with, twist, and tear down sex and gender stereotypes. Hannibal is a serial killer — prim and proper and baking in an apron. Will Graham is sweet and gentle… and also an ex-cop swilling whisky in his lumberjack shirt. They both appear one way to outsiders. But inside they are almost inverses — both of each other and of what you might expect. This is before we even consider the way two male original characters in Thomas Harris’ novel Hannibal //

Will Riverdale’s Faux-Progressivism Continue in Season Two?

August 18, 2017 // 0 Comments

Not every story is what it seems. When the teaser for season one of the CW’s Riverdale first appeared, audiences were intrigued and delighted by the cornucopia of progressiveness. The cast, while still predominantly white, suggested an attempt on the CW’s part to cast minorities — Ashleigh Murray (Josie) and her Pussycats are black women, Ross Butler (Reggie) is Asian-American, Camila Mendes (Veronica) is Latina. Furthermore, the teaser highlighted a fleeting kiss between Betty and //

Fiction With a Telescope: The Harry Potter Universe Before the Statute of Secrecy

June 9, 2017 // 4 Comments

A beautiful witch holds a cup of wine in the dark woods
In the film adaptation of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, there’s some subtle yet telling character placement. Seraphina Picquery, the President of the Magical Congress of the United States of America (MACUSA), and Tina Goldstein, the disgraced but competent Auror, are women. So what? Big deal. As contemporary European or North American audiences, it’s easy to have a casual reaction to women in positions of power. It’s not so simple though when you put it into historical context. //

Writing Magic: Politicizing Fan Culture

February 22, 2017 // 9 Comments

reading magic
“Words are, in my not-so-humble opinion, the most inexhaustible form of magic we have, capable both of inflicting injury and remedying it.” ~ Albus Dumbledore Fans are no doubt aware that online fanfics and the communities in which they circulate house rich critiques about gender, sexuality, race and identity. In fact, many fan writers deliberately insert feminist discourse, gender theory, and class commentary into their stories to make complex academic theories accessible for all readers. //

‘Rogue One’ Has a Women Problem

December 29, 2016 // 4 Comments

Warning: This article contains spoilers for Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. If you haven’t seen it yet, encase yourself in frozen carbonite and come back when you’ve recovered from hibernation sickness. In a 1978 interview on The Tonight Show, Johnny Carson asked astronomer Carl Sagan about the scientific accuracy of the Star Wars films. Sagan responded with disappointment about the one-dimensionality of the series’ creatures: “They’re all white. The skin of all the humans in Star //

Women in Anime: Empowered or Undermined?

July 29, 2016 // 4 Comments

Anime has risen over the last decade from a relatively obscure niche to a staple of pop culture. If you want to watch the latest series from Japan, you no longer have to go to your local VHS shop and hope that they have it in stock. Now, you can find any show you want, watch anything you want, whenever you want. In fact, anime is now so popular that people have written entire books filled with essays on the subject. I remember reading one, a long time ago, and one essay in particular. It //

E. L. James is My Hero, Kinda

October 21, 2015 // 1 Comment

In 2005, I told my friends I had written some fanfiction. They laughed, but it was too late to deter me from continuing, and ten years later I write romance novels for a living and they all have office jobs. Who’s laughing now, is what I’m saying. In 2011, 50 Shades of Grey hit the shelves and became everyone’s favorite controversial subject, whether they’d ever had contact with fanfic, romance novels, or BDSM before. There’s still a thinkpiece about it every week, so this week, //