Psychology

FriendFiction: Taking a Look at the Psychology behind RPF

February 11, 2016 // 0 Comments

If you’re familiar with the cartoon Bob’s Burgers, you may be aware of the oldest child’s obsession with writing “FriendFiction” because she ran out of fanfiction topics to write on. Tina Belcher has binders filled with stories starring her friends and classmates in elaborate fictional stories in which she often plays a key role. This isn’t just a figment of the show writers’ imaginations, real-person fiction is a real thing (I touched on the implications of real-person shipping //

The Bad Guy Always Wins: Why We Romanticize Antagonists

January 26, 2016 // 1 Comment

The first time I fell head over heels for an antagonist was when I read Interview with the Vampire at the wise old age of thirteen. I instantly became enthralled with Lestat in all his robust glory and his snarky, large personality despite him being portrayed as a selfish monster. I’ve always been fascinated by antagonists that don’t quite seem to understand they are the villain in someone else’s story. Eventually as a writer, and as a consumer of media, it became important for me to //

Five Psychological Benefits of Writing Fanfiction

October 21, 2015 // 5 Comments

In 2009 I began writing fanfiction as a means to jumpstart my creative process. I was so in love with the characters of the anime I was addicted to (Yu Yu Hakusho, by the way) that I wanted desperately for there to be more of their adventures and world than the complete series offered me. Burning through the entire series in two weeks’ only left that hunger festering. I was writing the first draft of a novel at the time, in between jobs and attending college. When I could no longer fill my //