LGBTQ

Stop Killing Lesbians: Convince Creators to Produce the Content You Love

July 25, 2016 // 4 Comments

You might have noticed that the majority of current media consists of boring or outdated plots or that there is a severe lack of representation for marginalized groups, despite the many changes to society in the last few years. We still see movies with the nagging wife/useless husband dynamic or sitcom jokes about how girls don’t visit comic book stores. If you have noticed this, you’re not the only one. With sales dropping and more consumers losing interest, why is the media industry still //

Why You Should Be Aware of Queerbaiting Tactics

April 8, 2016 // 5 Comments

“Queerbaiting” is the practice of some television shows and movies to attract queer fans by hinting at potential queer relationships or actually promising them (but not delivering). There is some debate even amongst fans about whether queerbaiting is actually a thing. Outside of fandom, many believe queer fans are reading too much into on-screen interactions. However, writers, producers, and executives nowadays do recognize the existence of a queer fan base, and they want to appeal //

That’s Wrong! Homophobia, Slash Art, and Late-Night Television

March 31, 2016 // 2 Comments

There has been a recent and unfortunate trend on late-night talk shows whereby hosts force sexually explicit fanart upon their celebrity guests to embarrass them and to provoke laughter from the audience. Mocking and ridiculing fan works on national television has led fans to restrict access to their works, remove them from the Internet, or in some cases, stop making fanart altogether. An even more insidious side of this trend, however, is the undercurrent of homophobia during these segments, //

Fan Activism: Trans Interventions in Fandom and Beyond

March 10, 2016 // 1 Comment

Fanfiction is political, subversive, radical. Writing Harry Potter as a girl, Hermione as black, or Ron as transgender exposes people to narratives written from the perspective of marginalized communities. But is writing fanfiction a type of activism? Fan activism refers to how participation in fandom develops into involvement in fan-led political activities. In a 2012 article entitled “‘Cultural Acupuncture:’ Fan Activism and the Harry Potter Alliance,” scholar Henry Jenkins defines //

Transfic: A History

February 23, 2016 // 0 Comments

Transfic, an emerging genre of fanfiction, refers to stories about transgender characters who do not usually identify as trans in canon. Unlike its precursor (genderswap) or parent (genderfuck) genres, which often gloss over sex and gender issues through the use of problematic tropes, transfic foregrounds the materialities of sex and gender transitions and strives to account for a full-range of transgender experiences. Looking at the archival history of this genre can help contextualize its //

StormPilot and the Race to the Future of Slash

February 4, 2016 // 2 Comments

“StormPilot” – the wildly popular new slash ship from the new Star Wars: Force Awakens film – has taken both fandom and the mainstream media by storm. Articles abound in mainstream press outlets about the pairing, discussing with all seriousness its genuine popularity and the possibility of its canonization. While pieces like this historically were often a not so subtle dig at the strange, exotic customs of those subcultural oddities – the fangirls and boys and people of the world – //

The Trouble With Genderswap

January 31, 2016 // 4 Comments

Genderswap stories proliferate in fandom: from Harriet Potter to Jeanne Picard to Shirley Holmes. The genre gained a foothold during the early 1990s, when queer fanfiction surged in popularity due to its transition from print-based zines to online. One of the most influential genderswap fics is My Fair Jeanne (Ruth Gifford, 1995), a Star Trek: The Next Generation fic in which Captain Picard is transformed into a woman by the alien trickster known as Q. By definition, genderswap fanfiction //

How To Make Your Own Fanzine

December 17, 2015 // 3 Comments

Before the rise of the internet, people got their fannish content from fanzines—amateur, small magazines printed in small batches and distributed by post or in person, often at fan conventions (and sometimes, secretly!) You can check out the Fanlore entry for fanzines if you’re curious about the history of the practice, but in short, fanzines are the direct modern precursor to the forums, Tumblr accounts, and fanfic archives of today. As fans, we owe a lot to zines. However, zines are not //