Culture

Finding Hope in the Impossible: How Star Trek Will Save the World

August 4, 2017 // 2 Comments

To save the world, Star Trek needs a reboot. When Star Trek: The Original Series debuted in 1966, fans were awed by the futuristic technology and equipment featured on the show. From the starship Enterprise to the tricorder, Trek established a yet unforeseen view into the future; one that was possible to attain. And now, 50 years later, we have seen exactly how much of a lasting effect Trek had on our development as a species. 3-D printing, the Internet, Wi-fi, Bluetooth, cell phones, //

Gates McFadden on Pranks, Sexism, and Spandex: Tales from Hal-Con

November 9, 2016 // 2 Comments

Last Sunday, FAN/FIC Magazine was granted a one-day pass to Hal-Con, the biggest, geekiest sci-fi convention in Atlantic Canada. Remarkably, it was also the first fan convention I’ve ever attended. So, armed with my con survival pack, I headed into the Halifax World Trade and Convention Centre to get my geek on. First, I hit up the vendor floor, where hundreds of artists, craftsmen, jewellers, and sellers had set up shop. Crammed onto the exhibition floor in the Scotiabank Centre, there was //

FAN/FIC Magazine’s 100th Article

September 6, 2016 // 0 Comments

We can’t believe it. This is our 100th published article. To celebrate this milestone, we decided to write a post about what we’ve been up to this past year. We’ve had several significant events (including the magazine changing hands), expanded our social media presence, and published some truly compelling articles by our talented writing team. Thank you to everyone who has written, read, or shared our articles. We can’t wait to publish 100 more. Malory Beazley Editor | //

Get Your Geek On: How to Survive Your First Fan Convention

August 22, 2016 // 1 Comment

Every year, thousands of people sporting their favorite geeky apparel or dressed as their favorite character descend on hotels and convention centers in most major cities. Fan conventions are a time for fans to gather together and share their unbridled, unashamed enthusiasm for all things geeky. But if you’ve never attended a fan convention before, how do you know where to start? I have been attending and staffing fan conventions for over a decade. I’ve got it tuned to a fine art, //

That’s Problematic: How Critical Discussion in Fandom is Going Wrong

April 13, 2016 // 1 Comment

At the end of last year, I left Tumblr for good. I then deleted my account a month or so later, when I realized I was happier and more mentally well than I had been when I was spending several hours a day—most of my free time—there. For me, that was a huge shift. For a long time, Tumblr had been the only thing holding my mental health together—I went there to find validation that my feelings and experiences were real, to be reassured that I wasn’t alone, and to enjoy the media I was //

That’s Wrong! Homophobia, Slash Art, and Late-Night Television

March 31, 2016 // 2 Comments

There has been a recent and unfortunate trend on late-night talk shows whereby hosts force sexually explicit fanart upon their celebrity guests to embarrass them and to provoke laughter from the audience. Mocking and ridiculing fan works on national television has led fans to restrict access to their works, remove them from the Internet, or in some cases, stop making fanart altogether. An even more insidious side of this trend, however, is the undercurrent of homophobia during these segments, //

How Writers Can (Better) Deal with Fandom Conflict

March 17, 2016 // 0 Comments

While I would not go so far as to say conflict is essential to fandom, I would say it is inevitable. Fans disagree about things, they always have, they always will, and nothing producers do or say, either in the text or outside of it, will forestall this inevitability. Works of art are open to interpretation, and with that openness comes people disagreeing about everything from who belongs with who romantically to whether or not X character deserves a redemption arc. Moreover, all art is //

Fan Activism: Trans Interventions in Fandom and Beyond

March 10, 2016 // 1 Comment

Fanfiction is political, subversive, radical. Writing Harry Potter as a girl, Hermione as black, or Ron as transgender exposes people to narratives written from the perspective of marginalized communities. But is writing fanfiction a type of activism? Fan activism refers to how participation in fandom develops into involvement in fan-led political activities. In a 2012 article entitled “‘Cultural Acupuncture:’ Fan Activism and the Harry Potter Alliance,” scholar Henry Jenkins defines //

The Ethics of Real Person Fiction

March 6, 2016 // 2 Comments

“Here’s my opinion on people writing sexually oriented fanfiction about real people. It’s WRONG, CREEPY, VERY EXTREMELY ICKY, and should be ILLEGAL.” This impassioned statement by Nightrunner author Lynn Flewelling in a 2004 response to fans is a clear indictment of Real Person Fiction or RPF. A lot is made in fan culture about the ethics behind RPF, a branch of fan writing defined by Fanlore as “fanfiction written about actual people, rather than fictional characters.” Both the //

Gone Too Soon: When Fanfiction Rescues Canceled Television

February 16, 2016 // 1 Comment

It doesn’t matter which genre is your favorite, or which fandom you call home—we’ve all felt the sting of a treasured show getting canceled prematurely. Thanks to reported ratings, a fan community can usually tell when a show is in its final moments. But sometimes a series that otherwise seems original, well-executed, and superbly written, can be canned before it has had a chance to find stable footing. What is a fan to do, then, when their favorite show comes to an abrupt close, leaving //